case of shipmony briefly discoursed, according to the grounds of law, policy, and conscience
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case of shipmony briefly discoursed, according to the grounds of law, policy, and conscience and most humbly presented to the censure and correction of the High Court of Parliament, Nov. 3. 1640. by Parker, Henry

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Published by s.n.] in [London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ship-money -- Early works to 1800

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesCase of ship-money briefly discoursed
GenreEarly works to 1800.
ContributionsEnglish Printing Collection (Library of Congress)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHJ2612 .P2
The Physical Object
Pagination[2], 49, [1] p. ;
Number of Pages49
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6991914M
LC Control Number07041383

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The case of shipmony briefly discoursed, according to the grounds of law, policy, and conscience: And most humbly presented to the censure and correction of the High Court of Parliament, Nov. 3. An Important Statement Concerning an Act that Pitted Parliament against Charles I Parker, Henry The Case of Shipmony Briefly Discoursed, According to the Grounds of Law, Policy, And Conscience. And Most Humbly Presented to the Censure and Correction of the High Court of Parliament, Nov. 3. 1 [Henry Parker] The Case, of Shipmony Briefly Discoursed, According to the Grounds Law, Policy, and Conscience. And Most Humbly Presented the Censure to and Correction of the High Court of Parliament, Nov. 3 ([London,] ) [STC ; B(ritish) L(ibrary is anothe) Er 4 (4)]. There. The case of shipmony briefly discoursed, according to the grounds of law, policy, and conscience. S.T.C. no. Description: 49 pages ; 22 cm. Series Title: English experience, its record in early printed books published in facsimile, no. Other Titles: Case of shipmony briefly discoursed, according to the grounds of law, policy, and conscience.

  Full title [Henry Parker], The Case of Shipmony briefly discoursed, according to the Grounds of Law, Policy, and Conscience. And most humbly presented to the Censure and Correction of the High Court of Parliament, Nov. 3. Printed Anno Dom. 1 [Parker, Henry], The Case of Shipmony Briefly Discoursed, According to the Grounds of Law, Policy, and Conscience. And Most Humbly Presented to the Censure and Correction of the High Court of Parliament, Nov. 3 a case of politics as of law, as Parker realized: the title page of The Case of Shipmony promised a discussion according to 'the Grounds of Law, Policy, and Conscience'. Some resented or affected to resent extra-legal argument. Jones claimed to decide the case according to .   Parker was a very prolific writer. He published, among other pamphlets: 1. ‘The Case of Ship Mony briefly discoursed, according to the grounds of law, policy, and conscience,’ &c., , 8vo. 2. ‘A Discourse concerning Puritans,’ &c., , 4to; attributed also to John Ley [q. v.] 3.

A state statute by which a life insurance company, if it fails to pay upon demand the amount due under a policy after death of the insured, is made liable in addition for fixed damages, reasonable in amount, and for a reasonable attorney’s fee is not unconstitutional even though payment is resisted in good faith and upon reasonable grounds. Landmark case in which Supreme Court called for a ban on the death penalty in Georgia Ruled its law as it stood was capricious and hence, cruel and unusual punishment The Court ruled that the states had to give judges and juries more guidance in capital sentencing to . Start studying Biz Law Chapter 5. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. there are reasonable grounds for the suspicion, (2) suspects are detained for only a reasonable time, and (3) investigations are conducted in a reasonable manner. a landmark case that established the doctrine of. Parker's Case of Shipmony, first published in November , begins by complaining in the same vein that the use of the royal prerogative to impose levies and forced loans ‘is incompatible with popular liberty’.’ 3 The tract ends by expressing the fear that England may soon be reduced to the level of France, where the king's absolute powers have oppressed the people and finally ruined the state. 4.